New York Times review of Ātash Sorushān (Fire Angels), performed at Carnegie Hall, March 29, 2011.

The Persian Rite of Spring was commissioned and co-sponsored by the Farhang Foundation.

The Persian Rite of Spring, created by Niloufar Talebi in collaboration with composer and media artist Bobak Salehi, is a multimedia show about the mythology, poetry, music, folklore and celebrations of Norouz/Norooz/Nowruz, a millennia-old tradition celebrated by Iranians and others around the world. The birth of light and its victory over dark is an archetypical dynamic with a series of ceremonies from Yalda (Winter Solstice) through 13-Bedar (Outdoor 13) that usher in the renewal of the world each spring, which The Persian Rite of Spring brings to life. The Persian Rite of Spring world-premiered at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art of March 14, 2010 and was commissioned by the Farhang Foundation.

Nowruz Tribute - Shahnameh
Nowruz Tribute - Shahnameh

The Translation Project is pleased to announce its newest show, The Persian Rite of Spring, commissioned by the Farhang Foundation, to world premiere at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) on March 14, 2010, at 12:30 PM.

The Persian Rite of Spring, created by The Translation Project’s Niloufar Talebi in collaboration with composer Bobak Salehi, is a multimedia show about the mythology, poetry, music, folklore and celebrations of Nowruz, a millennia-old tradition celebrated by Iranians and others around the world. The birth of light and its victory over dark is an archetypical dynamic with a series of ceremonies from Yalda (Winter Solstice) through 13-Bedar (Outdoor 13) that usher in the renewal of the world each spring, which The Persian Rite of Spring brings to life.

The performance will take place in the Leo S. Bing Theater at LACMA at 12:30 p.m. The event is FREE to the public. Due to limited seating (450), tickets are required and may be obtained free-of-charge on a first come, first served basis from LACMA’s box office, starting at 11 a.m. on Sunday, March 14th. LACMA is located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd • Los Angeles California 90036 • Phone: 323-857-6000.

The Persian Rite of Spring performance is part of Farhang Foundation’s second annual, all-day Nowruz celebration at LACMA on March 14, 2010 from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The performance will be followed by a special musical performance by the Hamed Nikpay Ensemble, which includes some of the most talented world musicians, performing Hamed Nikpay’s signature Persian melodies fused with a flamenco beat, at LACMA’s LA Times Central Courtyard.

“…the festival’s crown jewel…is ICARUS/RISE, which bridges the legend of the mythological figure with the migration of Iranians in search for freedom…” SF Examiner

ICARUS/RISE is a provocative and emotional multimedia theatrical performance of new Iranian poetry, translated, created and performed by Niloufar Talebi, with original score by Bobak Salehi, and choreography and video by Alex Ketley, featuring Chloe Felesina as Icarus. Woven of poems featured in BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books), and connecting the myth of Icarus with the solitary journey of the artist/immigrant in the quest for freedom, it tells the 30-year story of the migration of Iranians. ICARUS/RISE begins after the fall and is the journey to self-possession, featuring the emerging voices of Iranian poetry, including Ziba Karbassi, Granaz Moussavi, Maryam Huleh, Abbas Saffari, Jamshid Moshkani and Shahrouz Rashid, the poet of “Icarus”, as well as the poetry of Mina Assadi, and Yadollah Royaii.

Based on the poetry in BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World, ICARUS/RISE is inspired by the Iranian spoken word tradition of ‘Naghali’, which is practiced in the streets, cafes, public rituals, or ‘art music’ stage. By giving this spoken word tradition new content (new poetry in BELONGING) — rather than its usual content of classical Persian poetry and myths — and fusing it with western theatrical elements, ICARUS/RISE gives voice to hybrid-Iranians, reflecting their experience in contemporary society.

This has never been done before, certainly not in translation, and not in the west. Many younger Iranian-Americans have never been exposed to and don’t have familiarity with their heritage tradition of Naghali and may not realize that global phenomenon like Hip Hop theater or poetry slams have cultural precedents in the Iranian traditions of ‘Mosha’ereh’ and ‘Naghali’. In the same way that Ezra Pound’s translations of Chinese poetry helped shape 20th C. American poetry, and Stanislovski’s writings on acting shaped the American “method”, our goal with projects such as ICARUS/RISE is to help introduce an Iranian theatrical/literary contribution to the American artistic landscape.

Dear special supporters of the Translation Project,

     I am personally writing you to invite you for a special cause.  As an early believer in and/or contributor to our ground-breaking projects, you are in the position to make something happen for our small but mighty organization.

     Because the financial situation that unfolded last year, we respected our supporters’ space and did not send out any calls for support last year.  That was the last thing you needed.  Now with our new fiscal year starting on July 1, we think the time has come.

     Let me explain a little about WHY nonprofits need INDIVIDUAL donors:  apart from the obvious infusion of cash, the more important reason is to indicate income from individual donors on our FOUNDATION grant applications.  As you may know, the Translation Project has been steadily successful in garnering foundation support to deliver projects no other organization does (this may sound like a lot of income, but even with our success, the funds barely cover programming, let alone the infrastructure that makes that programming happen.  Go figure, that’s the imperfect world of US nonprofits for you!).  This is partly because we have shown DIVERSITY in income, which funders like.  So for this ‘little engine that could’ to continue its powerful work, it’s imperative that after taking one year off from individual contributions, that we indicate income in that category AGAIN.

     So I am personally asking you to consider making a tax-deductible donation to our 501 C 3 nonprofit.  We are without any religious or political ties.  We are committed to doing cultural work that builds bridges for Iranian culture.  Our day to day operations needs your support.  This means accounting, supplies and other boring things.  If you like what we do, wait until you hear about the project we are developing with an amazing young female Iranian epic storyteller (Gordafarid)…

With lots of heart and passion,

Niloufar Talebi

Founder/Director

Here are the donation options:
Secure online Paypal option:

PayPal Option
PayPal Option

Or

Mail a check written to the ‘Translation Project’ to this address:

The Translation Project
5214F Diamond Heights Blvd. #226
San Francisco, CA 94131-2175

********** ********** ********** ********** **********
If you are sending a check, please fill out this form for our records and to use on your tax letter:

Name _________________________________________________

Name for IRS tax purposes if different: _____________________________________________________

Phone________________________________________________

Address______________________________________________

City__________________________ State_____ Zip______________

Email address _____________________________________

Donation Amount $____________

Donation Method:

Check payable to The Translation Project Check # ______ or Money Order _____

Inspired by live translation slams that proved to be audience favorites at the Blue Metropolis Montreal International Literary Festival, and again at PEN World Voices, PEN’s online Translation Slam aims to showcase the art of translation by juxtaposing in a public forum two “competing” translations of a single work.

The poem chosen for the current installment is a political slogan devised by Iranian protesters who took to the streets this June after the official results of the presidential elections were announced. The slogan refers directly to an insult levied at protesters by current Iranian president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who referred to them as khas-o-khaashaak, meaning dirt and dust, scraps and bits….(read the two translations of this slogan here…)

آن خس و خاشاک تویی/ پست تر از خاک تویی
شور منم نور منم/ عاشق رنجور منم
زور تویی کور تویی/ هاله ی بی نور تویی
دلیر بی باک منم/ مالک این خاک منم

PEN American Center, The New York Review of Books and 92nd Street Y Unterberg Poetry Center present

IRAN: A CONVERSATION ABOUT THE ELECTIONS, PROTEST, AND THE FUTURE

With Shaul Bakhash, Roger Cohen, Haleh Esfandiari, and Karim Sadjadpour

Wednesday, July 15, 200, 7 PM

92nd Street Y Unterberg Poetry Center, 1395 Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
Subway: 4/5/6 to 86th Street

TICKETS: $15/$8 for students with ID and PEN members
www.smarttix.com or call 212-868-4444

Dear friends,

During these crucial times in Iranian history, as brave Iranian people fight for freedom, we continue to celebrate and present Iranian literature and words in translation, be it through solidarity readings, and continuous translation efforts, or through nominating Iranian writers for international literary prizes and more…We are in awe of the power of people coming together and look forward to seeing you at many events.

Translation Project Events:

Literatures of Resistance: In Solidarity w/ the Iranian People, July 11:

FREE EVENT featuring Rana Farhan, Luis Francia, Amir Parsa, THE TEHRAN-DAKAR BROTHERS , Eleanor Wilner, D. Nurske, Said Sayrafiezadeh, Roger Sedarat, Dalia Sofer, Niloufar Talebi and more!

This free event is sponsored by the Association of Iranian American Writers, Persian Arts Festival, The Translation Project, ArteEast and Bowery Arts and Science. Any contributions at the event will be donated to Amnesty International.
Saturday July 11, 2009, 2 – 5 PM, Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, NYC

Co-sponsored by KODOOM.COM

Ziba Karbassi presents at the SF International Poetry Festival, July 25-26:

Saturday July 25, 2009
Main Stage Poetry Reading with: Francis Combes, Ziba Karbassi, Georges Castera/Joj Kastra, Taslima Nasrin, Al Young, Ámbar Past, Tarek Eltayeb, Agneta Falk, Sasha Pimentel Chacòn, Ferruccio Brugnaro, Carla Badillo Coronado, and Jack Hirschman.

7:00 – 9:30 PM at *Palace of Fine Arts* San Francisco
AND

Sunday July 26, 2009
Ziba Karbassi (Iran) reading with Niloufar Talebi

3:30 – 5:00 PM, North Beach Poetry Crawl at *Cafe Trieste* San Francisco

Panel on Iranian poetry at the Philoctetes Center, September 22:

Iraj Anvar , Richard Jeffrey Newman , Roger Sedarat , Niloufar Talebi , Katayoon Zandvakili

Tuesday September 22, 2009, 7 – 8:30 PM, Philoctetes Center, 247 E 82nd St, NYC

ICARUS/RISE at Neustadt Festival of Int’l Literature & Cultures, Oct. 22:

Bobak Salehi and Niloufar Talebi perform ICARUS/RISE Remix at a World Literature Today event.

Program: ICARUS/RISE , Pireeni Sundaralingam and Colm O’Riain , Etgar Keret screening “Jellyfish

Thursday October 22, 2009, 7 PM at the University of Oklahoma

Recent Articles:

I must Go Home to Iran Again” by Marjane Satrapi in the New York Times
Memory of a Phoenix Feather: Iranian Storytelling Traditions and Contemporary Theater” by Niloufar Talebi in the July/August 2009 issue of World Literature Today

Books we recommend:

Censoring an Iranian Love Story (Knopf, 2009) by Shahriar Mandanipour, Tr. by Sara Khalili
Mr. Mandanipour is nominated for the 2010 Neustadt Literary Prize
Reviews of Censoring: New York Times ; The New Yorker

Translating Iran links:

Grassroots initiative for free translations for the Iranian freedom movement
New poems by Simin Behbahani on NPR

Translation of current slogans on iReport.com

Bobak Salehi and Niloufar Talebi perform ICARUS/RISE Remix at University of Oklahoma’s World Literature Today event, the 2009 Neustadt Festival of International Literature and Culture.

Evening program:

ICARUS/RISE Remix

Pireeni Sundaralingam and Colm O’Riain

Etgar Keret screening “Jellyfish
7 PM

A new radio show discussing the poetry of Li-Young Lee, Naomi Ayala, and BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World by Niloufar Talebi

Niloufar Talebi delivers a talk, ‘30 Years of Belonging: New Iranian Poetry Around the World‘ reading poetry by BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books, 2008), and presents a slideshow of slogans by Iranian protestors, in translation.
Yale University, Luce Hall Auditorium

September 24, 6:30 PM

Panel on Iranian poetry at the Philoctetes Center for the ‘Multidisciplinary Study of Imagination’ with:
Iraj Anvar
Richard Jeffrey Newman
Roger Sedarat (moderator and participant)
Niloufar Talebi
Katayoon Zandvakili

Tuesday September 22, 2009, 7 – 8:30 PM

247 E 82nd St
New York, NY 10028-2701
(646) 422-0544

Presenting translations of Ziba Karbassi’s poetry the San Francisco International Poetry Festival:

Saturday July 25, 2009
Main Stage Poetry Reading on with Francis Combes, Ziba Karbassi, Georges Castera/Joj Kastra, Taslima Nasrin, Al Young, Ámbar Past, Tarek Eltayeb, Agneta Falk, Sasha Pimentel Chacòn, Ferruccio Brugnaro, Carla Badillo Coronado, and Jack Hirschman.

7:00 – 9:30 PM at Palace of Fine Arts

AND

Sunday July 26, 2009
Ziba Karbassi (Iran) reading with Niloufar Talebi

3:30 – 5:00 PM, North Beach Poetry Crawl at Cafe Trieste

The Translation Project is a community collaborator of The San Francisco International Poetry Festival

Literatures of Resistance: In Solidarity w/ the Iranian People

FREE EVENT featuring Rana Farhan, Luis Francia, Amir Parsa, THE TEHRAN-DAKAR BROTHERS , Eleanor Wilner, D. Nurske, Said Sayrafiezadeh, Roger Sedarat, Dalia Sofer, Niloufar Talebi and more!

This free event is sponsored by the Association of Iranian American Writers, Persian Arts Festival, The Translation Project, ArteEast and Bowery Arts and Science. Any contributions at the event will be donated to Amnesty International.

Saturday July 11, 2009, 2 – 5 PM, Bowery Poetry Club, 308 Bowery, NYC

“Memory of a Phoenix Feather: Iranian Storytelling Traditions and Contemporary Theater,” an article by Niloufar Talebi in the July/August 2009 issue of World Literature Today.

Naghali Then and Now

A brief history on the story-telling tradition in Iran and how it has evolved: Naghali, Pardeh-dari, Pardeh-khaani, Ghavali (minstrelsy), Shahnameh-khaani, are Iranian story-telling traditions, practiced usually in the streets and coffee houses, story-teller titles varying according to their style of story-telling and the subject matter of the stories told. Pardeh-dari and Pardeh-khaani are visual forms of story-telling done before a big cloth or canvas (pardeh) hung in a square, or the walls of a tea of coffee house, painted on which are the events of the story being told, which the story-teller would refer to during their recounting.

Coffee house paintings are Iranian-style paintings, in the tradition of miniatures, but with European techniques and material, oil on canvas or cloth, which people in the streets and bazaars started to develop about 80 years ago. This was an attempt to distance art from royal courts and bring it into the hands of the people. Unknown artists who had gained experience in tile paintings, were inspired to create simple images on coffee house walls by the work of story-tellers and Shahnameh-khaans (those reciting the Book of Kings by Ferdowsi, which is in 50,000 couplets, and contains the history and epics of the Persian people from the Creation up to roughly the 7th C. before the Arab/Islamic invasion).

Further readings:

The Islamic Drama: Taziyah – by Jamshid Malikpour; The History of Theater in Iran – by Willem Floor; Coffee House Paintings – Iran Chamber Society

Battle of Karballa Royal Painting
Battle of Karballa Royal Painting

Pardeh of the same royal painting
Pardeh of the same royal painting

Naghali in a Cofee House (Ghahveh Khaaneh)
Naghali in a Cofee House (Ghahveh Khaaneh)

Naghali in a cafe
Naghali in a cafe

Pardeh-dari
Pardeh-dari

Naghali by females in Iran
Naghali by females in Iran

Morshed Torabi demonstrating Shahnameh Naghali
Morshed Torabi demonstrating Shahnameh Naghali

Female Naghal
Female Naghal

Our work is inspired by Iranian story-telling traditions. We perform new and contemporary Iranian poetry as our content, in both the Persian original and English translation. We also use multimedia video projections to create our Pardehs, and bring in other artists such as dancers and musicians on stage. We hope that this theatrical/literary tradition can find a place in American mainstream arts one day. To read about multimedia shows, ICARUS/RISE, and Persian Rite of Spring,  scroll down and visit links about the making of the show, the collaborative artists, and view youtube clips.

Niloufar Talebi reciting new Iranian poetry in Persian and English  translation
Niloufar Talebi reciting new Iranian poetry in Persian and English translation
ICARUS/RISE
ICARUS/RISE

ICARUS/RISE
ICARUS/RISE

ICARUS/RISE
ICARUS/RISE

ICARUS/RISE
ICARUS/RISE

Asia Pacific Forum WBAI 99.5 in NYC and live on the web, 8 PM

on the subject of Naghali and Iranian story-telling

Niloufar Talebi appears on the Leonard Lopate show on WNYC 93.9 FM in NYC.

Article by Niloufar Talebi in Tehran Bureau about Iranian literature in English translation.

Iran Away‘ – on the Iranian Literary Arts Festival 2009

Excerpt from the Introduction to BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books, Aug 2008), edited and translated by Niloufar Talebi:

___________________________________________________________________________________________
‘In my eighth year as a child growing up in Iran, I spontaneously composed a stanza, a poem, observing the falling of snow, when something took over and I knew it was poetry I was jotting down in a nylon-covered notebook. That notebook remained in the piles of things left behind. This was the country in which I recited over and over again “The woods are lovely, dark and deep, / But I have promises to keep, / And miles to go before I sleep, / And miles to go before I sleep” for our fifth-grade English class. In the fourth grade, the entire class would stand up from our wooden benches and recite an homage poem to mothers. At home, it was Sohrab Sepehri, “Wherever I am, let me be / The sky is mine / … Our work is perhaps / To run after the song of truth/in the distance between the lotus and the century.”

This was also the country in which I had the great fortune, as a teenager, during the four violent years I lived in Iran after the 1979 revolution, to sneak out of bed, way past bedtime, to eavesdrop on a poet in our living room. During these years of unrest, in order to usurp all the power, Ayatollah Khomeini was eradicating all other factions that had played a role in ousting the Shah. The old Iran was combusting into the Islamic Republic of Iran, and all homes were prey to sudden raids by the Islamic police. And though this was a poet so undeniably consequential that despite his outright opposition to Khomeini it would have been impossible to imprison him along with the thousands of other dissidents, we could never be too discreet about his visits to our home.

When he was visiting, it meant we were hosting a “literary salon.” It meant there were simultaneous discussions on art, literature, music, and world affairs. It meant Rachmaninov or Beethoven was blaring while a heated debate was under way in the kitchen, while another group in the living room provided endless commentaries on the nightly televised charades of the Iran-Iraq war, or the staged confessions by soon-to-be-released-or-executed enemy party leaders. Presiding over these salons, cigarette smoke rings dissipating over his full head of white hair, this poet would connect Nima, Lorca, Neruda, Hafez, Akhmatova, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Langston Hughes, Baudelaire, Hedayat, and Farrokhzad, among many others. He handed me many books over that time—carefully chosen, no doubt—each time asserting why this book was perfect for me at that time. In my thirteenth year, I got One Hundred Years of Solitude. Years later when I met him at UCLA where he was giving a lecture, he suggested Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita…’

‘Talebi addresses the state of writing in Iran’ – Iranian Literary Arts Festival in the SF Examiner

(content coming back soon)

Wikipedia list of Iranian writers throughout the centuries, which leads to other links with additional information.

Below is a partial list of poets featured in BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World:

Write up in Perspective Magazine by Roxanne Rashedi  (Fall 2008, pg. 18-19)

An article in Persian about BELONGING, by Ali Sabati.

University of Rochester’s ‘Three Percent’ reviews BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books, Aug 2008)

Through her translations of contemporary Iranian poetry, Niloufar Talebi discusses the step-by-step process of rendering poetry from one language into another.

See here for a sample talk on translation
Thursday April 16, 2000, 7:30 PM
Falkirk Cultural Center
1408 Mission Avenue
Downtown San Rafael, CA
415.485.3328

Interview with Suzi Khatami of KIRN670AM’s ‘Live From Hollywood’ on August 27, 2008.

Interview with J.P. Dancing Bear on Cupertino/Santa Clara’s KKUP poetry show, Out of Our Minds, on August 20, 2008. Audio coming soon.

Interview with Shaindel Beers on BlogTalkRadio on August 14, 2008.

Niloufar Talebi does a screens clips from ICARUS/RISE, and discusses Naghali and Pardeh-dari at the ‘From Ghazal to Zuihitsu: Translating Asian Languages and Cultures‘ conference for the ‘Translation in Performance’ panel. Other participants include: Admer Gouryh, a translator of modern Arabic drama who gets the audience acting out the plays; and Maryam Habibian, a Persian translator who depicts Forough Farrokhzad in her one act play/monologue.

Followed by keynote speech by Poet Li-Young Lee.

Creative Writing Program at Queens College,
65-30 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, New York, NY 11367
718/997-4600
4:30 PM – FREE

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World at Kepler’s Books.
Event introduced by Firoozeh Dumas, plus surprise poets! keplers.gif
February 19, 2009, 7:30 PM
Kepler’s Books
1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park CA, 94025
(650) 324-4321

Niloufar Talebi gives a talk at UC Berkeley, ‘30 Years of BeLonging: The Rise of new Iranian Voices’- co-sponsored by the English Department and the Center for Middle Eastern Studies.

Maude Fife Room – 315 Wheeler Hall - University of California, Berkeley campus, Berkeley, CA, 94720
6 PM

LibraryThing.com

Exlibrisbb.blogspot.com

Fast forward (box in the right column) to 32:00 minutes to hear Niloufar Talebi read from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the world on BlogTalkRadio, hosted by Rafael F.J. Alvarado & Shaindel Beers. (first 32 minutes are William O Daly, Translator of Pablo Neruda’s “Hands Of The Day”)

Longing for the past, yet belonging to the present” by Omid Memarian, for Inter Press Service

Also published in the Daily Star

Niloufar Talebi discusses translation of contemporary Iranian poetry and reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World.

7 PM, Book Passage, 51 Tamal Vista Blvd., Corte Madera, CA 94925 (415) 927-0960

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World and screens footage from ICARUS/RISE at UCLA. Event sponsored by the Iranian Student Group.

6 PM – FREE 308 Westwood Plaza, Kerckhoff Art Gallery, Kerckhoff Hall 2nd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90024

Leva Zand’s interview on BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the world (del-bastangui)

Niloufar Talebi gives a talk about BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World and screens footage from ICARUS/RISE at National University. Event co-sponsored by the Persian Culture Club of San Diego and National University, and Poets and Writers.

National University, 11255 North Torrey Pines Road, Room #123, La Jolla, CA 92037
8 PM – $10 general admission; students free

Niloufar Talebi presents a talk on the dramaturgy of ICARUS/RISE at the “Arts in the One World – Motherhood and Revolution” International Theater conference at CAL ARTS, a co-presentation by the California Institute of the arts (Valencia) and the Interdisciplinary Genocide Studies Center (Kigali)
California Institute of the Arts, 24700 McBean Parkway, Valencia, California 91355
2:00 – 3:30 PM at the Faculty Center

FREE

Niloufar Talebi discusses translation, reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books, August 2008), and screens clips from ‘Midnight Approaches’ and ‘ICARUS/RISE’.

Nassau Community College

Niloufar Talebi talks about contemporary Iranian poetry and translation

Poetry.LA posts Niloufar Talebi’s talks on translating Iranian poets Abbas Saffari, Ziba Karbassi and Naanaam, at the Orange County Poetry Festival on May 3, 2008, hosted by Tebot Bach.

On Saffari:

YouTube Preview Image

On Karbassi:

YouTube Preview Image

On Naanaam:

YouTube Preview Image

Creative Press Pack

A write-up about BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World
in the July/Aug 2008 Poets and Writers Magazine by Travis Nichols

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World at the
Persian Arts Festival’s Shab-e She’r at the Bowery Poetry Club.

Wednesday November 19th, from 6-8 PM
bowery.jpg308 Bowery
New York, NY 10012
(212) 614-0505

Niloufar Talebi reads her work-in-progress at the Ledig House International Writer’s Residency ‘KGB Bar reading series’.

kgb_logo.gifSunday November 9th, 7 PM
KGB Bar
85 East 4th Street
NYC 10003

For those of you who missed the 2007 premier of ICARUS/RISE at Theater Artaud, the San Francisco-based Red Poppy Art House is presenting an ICARUS/RISE Re-mix.

ICARUS/RISE is a multimedia theatrical piece based on poetry featured in BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World, connecting the myth of Icarus with the migration of Iranians, and the solitary journey of the artist/migrant in the quest for freedom.
redpoppy.jpgFriday October 10, 2008 and Saturday October 11, 2008
2698 FOLSOM SF,CA 94110

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World at Books Inc. Mountain View.

Thursday October 9, 2008 @ 7:30 PM
301 Castro Street, Mountain View
(650) 428-1234

booksINC.jpg

Writer and filmmaker Jason Rezaian hosts a reading of BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World (North Atlantic Books, August 2008), edited and translated by Niloufar Talebi, at his unique and soulful Persian rug store.

Rug Jones

531 Sutter St. (between Powell and Mason)
San Francisco, CA 94102

rugs@rugjones.com or call (415)399-1492

Niloufar Talebi participates in a panel, “East of Istanbul: Voices from the Muslim World” with Tamim Ansary, Anita Amirrezvani, Persis Karim, moderated by UpFront and New America Media’s Sandip Roy


October 6, 2008 at 6 PM – Mechanics Institute Library
57 Post Street, San Francisco, CA 94104 (415) 393-0100

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World at Litquake festival’s
Koret Reading Series, “Around the World in 60 Minutes”

Readers are:
Nguyen Do
Malena Watrous
Siddharth Shanghvi
Niloufar Talebi
Zoë Ferraris
Saikat Majumdar
Erika Mailman
Saturday October 4, 2008, 12 Noon
Book signing at 5:30 PM
San Francisco Public Library, 100 Larkin Street
San Francisco CA 94102-4733 – (415) 557-4400

Screening ‘Midnight Approaches’, a DVD of short films based on the poetry in BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World.

Mother_CAPTION_erase.jpgSaturday October 4th, 7 PM
Various locations around Folsom and 23rd Street in San Francisco

BELONGING on Payvand

Niloufar Talebi reads from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World
at the Cornelia Street Cafe.

Thursday September 25, 2008

29 Cornelia Street, NYC 10014

212-989-9319

6-8 PM. $7 admission includes a drink.
Co-sponsored by Kodoom.com

The Middle East and Middle East American Center at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center hosts an evening for BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World.

Wednesday Sept. 17, 2008, 6.30-8.30 PM
365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016-4309

Rooms C204/205
212/817-7570

Co-sponsored by Kodoom.com

Niloufar Talebi reads from “BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World” (North Atlantic Books), along with Joyce Zonana, who will talk about and sign copies of her memoir “Dream Homes, From Cairo to Katrina, an Exile’s Journey” (Feminist Press 2008), about growing up Egyptian American and Jewish.

6-8 PM
Levantine Cultural Center
1012 S. Robertson Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA

310/657-5511

The Asia Society Northern California co-presents the first reading of BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World in San Francisco, at Stacey’s Bookstore in downtown SF.
Tuesday August 5th, 2008, 12:30 – 1:30 pm
581 Market St
San Francisco, CA 94105
(415) 421-4687

View our events photo gallery here

Niloufar Talebi performs selections from BELONGING: New Poetry by Iranians Around the World with musicians Bobak Salehi, Nat Hulskamp, Chaz Hastings, Fabod Sedeh, Basheer Badii and Parisa Rabii at the Iranian Festival in Portland.

Local Portland paper digest of events

James_Irvine.jpgThe Iranian Literary Arts Festival was made possible in part by a grant from the James Irvine Foundation.

Published by North Atlantic Books, distributed by Random House

This anthology features 18 Iranian poets whose work varies dramatically in style, tone and theme, including Amir-Hossein Afrasiabi’s lyric poems, erotic divertissements by Ziba Karbassi, rigorously formal poetry by Yadollah Royaii, experimental poems by Naanaam, powerful polemics by Maryam Huleh, and the personal-epic work of Shahrouz Rashid. Eclectic and accessible, these vibrant poems deepen the often limited awareness of Iranian identity today by not only introducing readers to contemporary Iranian poetry, but also expanding the canon of significant writing in the Persian language. Belonging offers a glimpse at a complex culture through some of its finest literary talents.

Read an excerpt of the Introduction to BELONGING.

Order on Amazon.com

“Niloufar Talebi’s accomplishment in gathering the poetry of the Iranian diaspora is unprecedented and breathtaking. It is as if she has, by force of commitment and vision, and by way of cultural hunger, bequeathed a new literary heritage to Iran and the world….”
–Carolyn Forché
Editor of Against Forgetting: Twentieth Century Poetry of Witness


“Niloufar Talebi has accomplished the ultimate magic trick in her clean and modern translation. She has made the work of modern Persian poets read like original English … an unparalled contribution.”

–Willis Barnstone
Author of With Borges on an Ordinary Evening in Buenos Aires

“Poetry is a world art because of brilliant editors and translators like Niloufar Talebi … Here are the poets, in all their power, defiance, dignity, wildness, and lyric grace, scattered across the earth, yet united in this book…”
–Martín Espada
Pulitzer Prize nominee and author of The Republic of Poetry

“With literary skill and passion, Niloufar Talebi overcome the obstacles of matter, time and geographical space to produce a remarkable collection of Iranian poetry in diaspora … BELONGING is a major contribution to the recognition of contemporary Iranian literature in the West, to the appreciation of diaspora poetry by Persian-speakers everywhere, and to the important project of producing good translations form rich but under-represented literary canons for the anglophone reader. ”
–Nahid Mozaffari
Editor of the PEN Anthology of Contemporary Iranian Literature

Contemporary Poetry in Translation:
Paul Vangelisti, Hélène Cardona, and Niloufar Talebi read their translations of contemporary poetry and discuss their processes of translation.

Sponsored by Tebot Bach

May 2nd @ 8 PM
Golden West College, Community Room 102
Huntington Beach, CA
Free Parking and Admission

Interview with Moniru Ravanipur before her controversial talk at the Iranian Literary Arts Festival in November 2007.

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November 2007:

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November 12, 2007 article in the SF Examiner:

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http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-49319677250964854
Keynote Speaker, Moniru Ravanipur

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Dr. Fatemeh Keshavarz

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Richard Jeffrey Newman

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Zack Rogow

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Poet of “Icarus” poem, Shahrouz Rashid

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Ram Devineni

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Choroegrapher Alex Ketley

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Music Rehearsals with composer Bobak Salehi, cellist Kristina Forester, percussionist Ian Ding, choreographer Alex Ketley, dancer Chloe Felesina, and creator, Niloufar Talebi.

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Panelists:

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Keynote Speaker, Moniru Ravanipur

Alex Ketley as Icarus
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Music Rehearsals with composer Bobak Salehi, cellist Kristina Forester, percussionist Ian Ding and creator, Niloufar Talebi.ICARUS:RISE-reh3_2.JPG
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Festival registration is easy: Just buy a ticket for one of 3 ICARUS/RISE evenings to be automatically registered for all festival events.

Theater Artaud, 450 Florida, San Francisco

Tuesday November 13

Film Screenings (co-curated by the Translation Project and Beyond Persia):
6-7 PM – The Green Cold, from Nasser Saffarian’s trilogy on Forough Farrokhzad (60 min)

Director Nasser Saffarian deftly combines interviews with family members and peers with footage of Farrokhzad shot by Bernardo Bertolucci. Saffarian digs deep into her personal and professional life to uncover new information about this outspoken artist. A revealing look at her private world.

7:10-7:30 PM – “The House is Black” by Forough Farrokhzad (22 min)

A landmark in Iranian cinema, and spliced with Farrokhzad’s narration of quotes from the Old Testament, the Koran and her own poetry, it is a look at life and suffering in a leper colony and focuses on the human condition and the beauty of life.

7:40-9:10 PM – Seeds by Marjan Safinia (90 min)

“…a spectacular film…truly impressive” —Judy Woodruff, CNN
Feature Documentary of Middle Eastern teenagers who spend 3 weeks at camp with their “enemy”.

9:20-10:20 PM – Ahmad Mahmoud, A Noble Novelist, by Bahman Maghsoudlou (60 min)

An acclaimed story-writer and novelist, Ahmad Mahmoud was born on December 25, 1931 in Ahwaz. In his youth he worked as a day laborer, driver, construction worker and suffered imprisonment for his political views.

Wednesday November 14

Film Screenings (co-curated by the Translation Project and Beyond Persia):
6-6:30 PM – Young Republic by Nooshin Navidi (30 min)

“An authentic glimpse into the Under 30 generation that makes up 65% of Iran’s current population.”

6:40-7:40 PM – “The Mirror of the Soul”, from Nasser Saffarian’s trilogy on Forough Farrokhzad (60 min)

Director Nasser Saffarian deftly combines interviews with family members and peers with footage of Farrokhzad shot by Bernardo Bertolucci. Saffarian digs deep into her personal and professional life to uncover new information about this outspoken artist. An exploration of her ground-breaking, controversial, and erotic poetry.

7:50-8:30 PM – Beyond Words by Jahanshah Ardalan (40 min)

“Sometimes the further you go away, the deeper you go within.”
A Never before seen documentary of the secret rituals of the Kurdish Sufis.

8:40-9:40 PM – Ahmad Shamlou, Master Poet of Liberty” by Bahman Maghsoudlou (60 min)

A documentary about one of the most important Iranian poet and intellectual icon.

9:50 PM – Aref Squared by Nader Davoodi

“A funny documentary that chronicles the fantasy of a Cab driver in Tehran that he will someday sing on stage with the famous singer, Aref”

Thursday November 15

Art Exhibit by Beyond | Persia, Hors d’œuvres (7pm)

World Premier of ICARUS/RISE (8-9)

A multimedia theatrical piece based on new Iranian poetry. Connects the myth of Icarus with the migration of Iranians, and the solitary journey of the artist/migrant in the quest for freedom. ICARUS/RISE begins after the fall and is the journey to self-possession, featuring the emerging voices of Iranian poetry, including Ziba Karbassi, Granaz Moussavi, Abbas Saffari, Maryam Huleh and Shahrouz Rashid, the poet of “Icarus”.

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ICARUS/RISE

Created by Niloufar Talebi
Original Score by Bobak Salehi
Choreography and video by Alex Ketley
Percussion, Ian Ding
Cello, Kristina Forester
Lighting Design, Allen Willner
Dramaturg, Zack Rogow

Post-Show cast meet & greet, dance party

Friday November 16

Art Exhibit by Beyond | Persia, Hors d’œuvres (7pm)

ICARUS/RISE (8-9)

Post-Show cast meet & greet, dance party

Saturday November 17

Bookstore (11 am-4 pm)
Panel 1: “Literature and Performance” (11-12:15)
With Ram Devineni, Zack Rogow, Niloufar Talebi
Panel 2: “Iranian literature as World Literature” (12:30-1:45)
With Martin Riker, Fatemeh Keshavarz, Richard Jeffrey Newman
Keynote Talk (2-3:15)
Moniru Ravanipur: “Why is Iranian Literature not World Literature (yet)”
Book Signing (3:20-4)
Moniru Ravanipur, Fatemeh Keshavarz, Richard Jeffrey Newman, Ram Devineni, Shahrouz Rashid…Reception and Art Auction (6-7)
ICARUS/RISE (7-8)
Gala Dinner and Live Entertainment (8-11:30)

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RevWEB1.jpgFor twenty-eight years since the 1979 Iranian revolution, a massive number of Iranians have immigrated to other countries. This resettlement has given birth to a new chapter in the history of Persian literature, one created in diaspora. The Persian literary community in diaspora is a vibrant and dynamic one. Generations of poets, carrying on the tradition of Persian poetry, have created work of significant literary value outside of Iran. Poets living in diaspora vary in age and stage of career; some were already established prior to the revolution, some were young poets then, while others in their twenties are just now coming into their own. Additionally, their immigration has occurred at different points during this twenty-seven year time span, a variable that in combination with their differing stages of career, has created a flourishing diversity of sensibilities and voices in these poets. They live the world over- from Slovakia to Denmark to the United States.

This literature has naturally diverged from that created in Iran, so much so that it has often been-controversially-dismissed in Iran for not being truly “Iranian.” Since for political, financial and logistical reasons, most of this work is not published or read in Iran, there is no continuity in documenting this body of work as a valid component of the whole of literary work created in the Persian language. Thus this literature of diaspora remains somewhat homeless in that it is scattered worldwide and has limited readership due to the lack of geographic and linguistic centrality.

However, it seems inconceivable that this poignant collected voice should gradually wane from the annals of history simply by the confluence of the above-mentioned factors. Should there not be a survey of this literature aside from the collections edited in Persian and outside of Iran-which again for various reasons may or may not make their way to a large readership? This poetry must reside on a global level especially since it has been born out of a political event not unlike many throughout the world. Of these poems, occasionally and unsystematically, some have been translated into other languages, and no effort has been made to create a comprehensive anthology in English, one of the foremost languages of the world today. English readers are exposed mainly to translations of Rumi, Hafez and Khayyam, but to these readers, the contemporary Persian poet remains unknown and invisible.
…….

” I lived in Iran intermittently until I was fifteen. My most prominent memories of Iran are from the four tumultuous years that I lived in Tehran after the 1979 revolution, between 1980 and 1984. During this time of political unrest and war, we sometimes harbored poets and literary dissidents at our home. As a teenager, I found myself surrounded by inspired poets, passionately engaged in the creation of literature that spoke to and of the humanity of the situation at hand…poets feverishly writing, discussing or listening to Rachmaninov blaring from our gramophone. Their passion for life and commitment to literature surpassed their fear that the Islamic Police could raid our house at any time, attracted by the loud music. Some mornings at my house, clad in mandatory Islamic dress and on my way to school, I would tiptoe out, knowing that poets had been at work until the early morning hours and had recently collapsed from the exhaustion of all-night debates about religion, the Shah, Neruda, or fellow Iranian writers. These were artists who lived in exile within their own country. Many years later, I still find myself enthralled by artists in exile, voluntary or not. They are the lasting voice who as E. L. Doctorow put it, “…connect the invisible to the visible…singing the unsingable–who we are, what we are becoming…” The company I was privileged to keep during my youth has shaped my life. With The Translation Project, I wish to pay homage to those who endure. ” NT

Interview (in Persian) with Voice Of America on December 16th, 2006 with “Roundtable With You”, Meezgerdi Baa Shomaa.

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Voice of America

Files are quite large, they will take some time to download.

Front page write up in the Press Republican on our November 2006 Multimedia Conference on Modern Iranian Women Poets, celebrating the life and work of legendary Iranian poet, Forough Farrokhzad.

Press Republican Front Page
Press Republican Front Page

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Press Republican Page 2

DVD screens at the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) annual conference in Boston. November 18-21.

The Translation Project organizes a multi-media conference on the life and poetry of Iranian women poets including and since Forough Farrokhzad. Conference presentations include Farrokhzad’s only film, The House is Black, the Nasser Saffarian trilogy of films on Farrokhzad, Sard-e Sabz, Jaam-e Jaan, and Oj-e Moj. Dr. Maryam Habibian presents a lecture, a theater piece and a short documentary on the life and work of Farrokhzad. Niloufar Talebi presents a dramatic reading of selections from her Anthology of Contemporary Iranian Poetry Around the World, a lecture on contemporary Iranian poetry and a screening of Midnight Approaches….

November 14-15, State University of New York, Plattsburgh

Read Press Republican's Article
Read Press Republican's Article


Niloufar Talebi presents an evening of dramatic readings of contemporary Iranian poetry accompanied with live music by multi-instrumentalist, Bobak Salehi and goup, at the annual American Literary Translators Association conference in the Seattle area.

Conference October 18-21

Reading translations of contemporary Iranian poetry.

Niloufar will read at Lit Crawl, the final event of Litquake as part of:
One World, Many Languages: Literature in Translation
Lineup also includes: Chana Bloch, Hamida Banu Chopra, Zack Rogow, John Oliver Simon

Abandoned Planet Bookstore, 518 Valencia street, 6-7 pm

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Presenting a paper on Contemporary Iranian Poets outside Iran and screening our films based on these voices.
October 6-8, Brattleboro, VT

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“I found the marriage of visual, musical and poetic imagery in Niloufar
Talebi’s work to be touching and effective and an ideal way to discover
and appreciate contemporary Iranian poetry.”
- Michael Tilson Thomas
Music Director, San Francisco Symphony

“An accomplished translator, Niloufar Talebi is presenting our rich Iranian tradition to the world with The Translation Project. I appreciate her long and valuable journey and wish her the best in her difficult job.”
- Shahrnush Parsipur
Author of Tooba and the Meaning of Night and Women Without Men

View Trailer

Preview silent auction items

Let’s face it, no matter where you are, or what time it is, midnight is always approaching. What this means is that the time has arrived when you must take into account all that has happened. Which is what Niloufar Talebi and The Translation Project have done via their multi-dimensional, evocative and entertaining Midnight Approaches….

While Iran is currently in the news because of politics and religious fanaticism, The Translation Project feels compelled to show more, and give voice to contemporary Iranian literature. Midnight Approaches… features poets living outside the country due to forces that have gripped the country since 1979 and continue to still shape the world today.

These poems express what it’s like to be transplanted, to have humor, to be alone, to be in love, or to yearn. In much the same way that The Kite Runner centered on an Afghani family but conjured universal truths, these poems also communicate things that exist beyond translation, yet rely on it in order to be understood.

These poets are not unlike the “lost generation” writers of the Twenties-Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, Fitzgerald, and Pound-who wrote as Americans but with a worldly experience after moving to Europe. As the most European of American cities, San Francisco makes a natural home for the resilience and spirit of these poems. Much as it did for the Beat poets and their words of that time.

Iran has had a long history of supporting the arts through state institutions. Unfortunately this support no longer exist. If Iranian arts, letters and culture are going to survive, it will be through the support of both the Iranian and American communities for works like The Translation Project. We rely on your support and thank you for it.
This benefit screening of the long-awaited Midnight Approaches… will show in public for the first time the combination of performance, music and dance that brings this poetry to life.
Sponsorship opportunities:
Platinum – $5000
-5 copies of the DVD and 5 VIP seats
-Premium billing in program
-Personal thanks in opening or closing remarks at the benefit
-Mention by Niloufar Talebi during appearance on KRON 4 news segment
-Co-producer credit on upcoming film, “Love is Lemony”

Gold – $3000
-3 copies of the DVD and 3 VIP seats
-Featured billing in program
-Credit in Anthology
-Personal thanks in opening or closing remarks at the benefit

Silver – $2000
-2 copies of the DVD and 2 VIP seats
-Featured billing in program
-Credit in Anthology
-Personal thanks in opening or closing remarks at the benefit

Admission
Reception, silent auction and screening – $75.00
Reception, silent auction, screening and musical performance – $125.00
All of the above plus a copy of our DVD – $200.00
Those already owning a DVD, full admission is $100/person or $200/couple
Event Details
Reception and silent auction 6-7pm
Screening 7-8pm
Musical Performance by Ostaad Nejad 8-9pm

Catering generously donated by Maykadeh restaurant in North Beach
Wines donated by Le Pialet and Stephen Vincent Wines
Theater courtesy of Jean Shelton Actors Lab

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The September 24th Benefit Screening is featured on KRON 4 Weekend Update. View 9/17/06 appearance footage below.

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Poet Majid Naficy participates in The Resilience of the Human Spirit, An International Gathering of Poets. Other participating poets are Carolyn Forche, Naomi Shahib Nye, Li-Young Lee, Lillian Boraks-Nemetz, Yasuhiko Shigemoto, Alexandre Kimenyi, Claribel Alegria, Choman Hardi, Orlando Ricardo Menes, Dunya Mikhail, Valzhyna Mort, and Nguyen Chi Thien.
Spetember 16-17 at the Guthrie Center in Great Barrington, MA
Sponsored by Blue Flower Arts

Guest teaching former SF poet laureate, devorah major’s, “World Poetry and Resistance” class in San Francisco at the California College for the Arts.

Interview with Omid Memarian on BBC Persian.

Participation in Mehregan events include dramatic reading and film screening. More info later.
September 9-10
Orange County

In-depth interview about The Translation Project called,
“New Life, Through Translation”

Rozaneh Magazine
Iranian.com
Peyvand

Articles by Niloufar Talebi about translation:
‘100 Essential Books by Iranian Writers (Available in English) General Introduction
‘100 Essential Books by Iranian Writers (Available in English) Translation Introduction
The Art (and Politics) of Translation

Facts about the state of translated literature in the United States:

Very few works of literature written in languages other than English ever find their way into the US market. Statistics suggest that of all books published annually in the US, less than 3% are works of translation, and that includes retranslations, reissues, and non-literary works. The number of literary fiction, non-fiction and poetry is more like 0.3-0.7%, mostly comprised of European literature since countries such as France, Germany, Greece, Italy, etc., provide support for the translation of their literature into English and other languages.

Therefore, translations of Iranian literature, especially contemporary Iranian literature, are far and few between, but growing. Historically, emphasis has been placed on the translations of classical Persian literature, but things are shifting: the number of excellent literary translators is growing and more interest is placed on translating contemporary Iranian literature.

The standard process by which publishers consider a work of translation is through the submission of a proposal and a sample translation. The proposal is submitted either by an author, or better yet, by a literary agent. To find a literary agent, writers are generally required to have several samples of their work in translation.

Writers interested in pursuing a professional writing career in the US should consider their decision in commissioning a work of translation as a financial investment in the future of their work. They must research and select a translator who has experience in translating works of the same genre and who can create English versions of an original text that stand on their own.

Services we offer:

The Translation Project is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to bring Iranian-inspired literary and multimedia projects to audiences around the world. Because the US book market and publisher practices — which we do not control — allow for very few translations, the reality is that very few literary works from Iran get translated into English and published, far fewer than the number we would like.

We are not a publishing house, nor can we sponsor the translation of the numerous unsolicited submissions we receive. However, we do provide — at standard rates — translation, editorial and proposal writing services such as literary translation, editorial services, which can include proposal writing, co-writing/translation, and others services. Approximate fees are generally listed on the Editorial Freelancers Association website.

In exceptional cases, a translator might agree to a different fee if he or she feels strongly about the work and believes it stands a good chance of being matched with a publisher. In those instances, writers and translators can seek funding assistance from organizations that offer grants and awards to literary translation projects. A list of these organizations is available through The American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and the PEN American Center.

Translators, when working with a living writer, work closely with the writer to fully grasp the style, structure and substance of his or her work, and they often do their best work when they are entrusted with the final decision in creating the English text. It is therefore essential for writers to select a translator whose work they believe in and who they can trust to make those ultimate decisions in rendering their work into English.

Please email us with your inquiry.

7X7_logo.gifThe September issue of 7 X 7 Magazine calls our project as “Most Likely to Make You Want to Learn Farsi”, pg. 217

A 1-hour interview with 670 am KIRN about The Translation Project and our events at the OC Mehregan. Audio download of the interview coming soon.

Article about the project (in Persian)

Screening Midnight Approaches….
LA Film Society,
11338 Santa Monica Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90025

Presentation about the project and how to become a part of growing the presence of contemporary Iranian literature on the world stage.

Iranian-American Chamber of Commerce meeting at Santorini restaurant

242 O’Farrell street in San Francisco, 7-9 pm

6th Biennial on Iranian Studies, co-sponsored by the Iran Heritage Foundation
School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, UK
August 3-5

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View highlights from the bilingual interview with Iranican live on the Persian News Network.

دوستان عزیز دوزبانه–انگلیسی-فارسی–میتوانند قسمتی از گفتگو را اینجا ببینند

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Interview with Iranican Live (Jul. 15, 2006)

You can watch clips from the live performance, as well as short films of Four Springs, which premiered on January 25, 2004, at ODC Theater in San Francisco, and later performed at the Heritage Theatre in Campbell, CA on May 15, 2004. Four Springs was directed by Zara Houshmand, co-produced by the Translation Project and Afsaneh Art and Culture Society. Four Springs was based on the poetry of Partow Nooriala, Abbas Saffari, Ziba Karbassi, Majid Naficy, Reza Framand and Saghi Ghahraman. Midnight Approaches, our DVD of short films was based on Four Springs.

An interview with Persian Mirror

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